Grass-Fed Meat Is A Cut Above

grass-fed meat

Howdy, Moinkers! It’s JoAnna, Moink’s resident healthy hen, gym rat and boy mama! 2018 is now in full swing, but hopefully you’re still on the resolution bandwagon. Or maybe you’re like me, and you’ve already fallen off the wagon a few times, but you just keep crawling back on! If eating cleaner is one of your New Year goals, switching to grass-fed beef and lamb is a great place to start.

Here at Moink, we like to call ourselves tender-hearted carnivores. We want to enjoy delicious-tasting protein, but only from an animal that was ethically-sourced, humanely-harvested, and given a life worthy of its sacrifice. Once you hear about, and even more so when you see with your own eyes, the treatment of animals in big farm confinement buildings and feedlots, you’ll swear off meat faster than you can say, “I’ll have the tofu burger.”

You see, traditional (NON grass-fed) beef cattle spend their first year on the range, but then they’re sent to a feedlot for the last several months of their lives. In addition to living in cramped, unsanitary conditions, they are pumped with processed feed with genetically-modified corn, antibiotics and byproducts. The idea is to fatten them up by as much as 600 pounds before they are slaughtered.

Goats and sheep were designed to eat forage like grass and hay, but when they are sent to a feedlot and given concentrated amounts of corn, soy and byproducts to speed up growth, it destroys their digestive system and causes metabolic disorders. Between the low-quality feed and all the antibiotics and dewormers they are given to ward off infections and parasites, their immune systems are completely shot. When you buy that store-bought rack of lamb, there’s a strong chance that meat has been infected with disease and drugged to high heaven.  

We believe in a kinder, better way.

grass-fed meat

Humanely-Raised

Moink only works with beef suppliers like The Mannix Family in Montana and John Wood in Missouri, whose cattle spend their entire lives in the pasture, and not the confinement building. Our lamb partner, Brad Ingram, moves his herd to fresh pasture every day to ensure the highest-quality, 100% grass-fed meat. I love knowing that Moink animals live healthier, happier lives.

Ethically-Sourced

Good meat comes from healthy land. That’s why another requirement of a Moink farmer is being a good steward of the environment. Our partners view themselves as managers, rather than owners, of the land, sea and animals. They care for the whole ecosystem, so it can flourish for generations to come.

Exceptional Quality & Flavor

You can also feel all warm and fuzzy about the nutritional benefits of pasture-raised meat. Grass-fed beef has less total fat, more heart-healthy Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Conjugated Linoleic Acid and more antioxidants like Vitamin E. Grass-fed lamb has 8% more protein and is richer in Vitamin B-12, Niacin, Zinc and Iron. Both meats have higher anti-cancer and anti-diabetes properties.

Need one more really important reason to make the switch to grass-fed meat? It just tastes BETTER! When animals are able to live and flourish in a natural environment and eat the way nature intended, meat tastes like it’s supposed to taste (It’s not rocket science, people!). Moink beef and lamb is lean, tender and downright delicious, but I’m not the only one who thinks so. Get it straight from the Moinkers’ mouths!

Annette said, “Best steak I’ve had in years. And knowing that each provider has been vetted as ethical makes being a carnivore a bit easier. Love the product, love the company.”

Jayda also gave this rave review: “I recently got my box and I have to say my lamb was perfect, and my sirloin has convinced me that I don’t need Butcher Box anymore. The steaks at Moink are way superior. Thank you Moink. Keep it coming.”

Moink has been a total game-changer for my family of five, and I know your crew will love it too. Ready to taste the grass-fed goodness? Order your Moink Box today.

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